Sunday, April 28, 2013

If I Had It All To Do Again


I was 12 when I wrote my first song, and songwriting has been a big part of my life ever since then. It helped me to cope with a lot of life's events, and gave me a way to express my desires, my opinions, and my sense of humour in some cases. As it turns out, many songwriters start writing at about that time in their lives, and for the same reason. The angst-filled adolescent and teenage years are truly a creative (or destructive, in some cases) hotbed for all kinds of things.

I've written dozens and dozens of articles on all aspects of songwriting since I first put up a website in 1995. I've met a lot of other songwriters over the years because of that website, and participated in other online sites, some of which are still very active. They include the Muses Muse, a huge songwriting community created by a fellow Canadian Jodi Krangle, and SongU, a kind of songwriting university designed by Danny Arena and his wife Sara Light from Nashville, both of who are very involved in teaching and who have also written songs for a Broadway musical. It was really exciting to watch when they were nominated for a Tony!

I've performed hundreds of times for the smallest of events to big ones, for all kinds of people. My smallest audience was an audience of one :-). It was at a coffee shop in Burnaby a few years back in the middle of winter. The evening started out as a poetry reading, and I was supposed to be the second act. Well, once the poetry reading was over, the audience all left too! All except for one. She sat on a couch and patiently listened through a whole set of my songs. We laughed in between at this odd, private concert she was getting. Outside it was dark and raining pretty hard...no wonder there were no stragglers off the street, it was a terrible night! It would be hard to say what my largest audience was...but I've performed for audiences at festivals where there were literally hundreds and probably thousands of people within earshot.

There was a time when I didn't even perform my own material, I basically just played cover songs at bars in order to make some money. I'd slip the odd original song in, but I had little confidence in my own songs then. I didn't like that kind of performing much...driving alone up to Duncan, about an hour's drive from my home, over a pretty tricky part of the highway called the Malahat, playing three hours, and then driving back again after midnight, was not my idea of a good time. I just about gave up performing for good after that!

In the early 90's I discovered recording and that was the beginning of a whole new aspect of music for me. I began by recording my own songs, of course, but I also got to record others, and had an opportunity to record some music for a television series called "Home Check with Shell Busey". When I listen now to those first recording attempts, I cringe :-). I didn't take any training, all of my learning came hands on. And I made a lot of mistakes! Eventually, I got better...the highlight came when I was asked to write the theme music along with many other music beds for CHEK News here in Victoria.

Another aspect of music that blossomed for me was teaching guitar. I made a proposal to a local community organization to teach adults guitar in an eight week program and I did that for a couple of years beginning in 1989. Then I was approached by a woman, Becky Bernson, who was also a guitar teacher, to become a part of an organization called the Whistling Gypsy. It was meant to be a kind of teaching umbrella, but part of the mandate was to put on folk music concerts featuring better known artists and groups travelling through our area. Becky and I would each teach guitar classes and private students out of our homes, and she gathered up other teachers in voice, bass, mandolin, and banjo among others.

At its peak, the Whistling Gypsy did very well, but it was a non-profit organization and it was hard to keep enough volunteers involved to manage the events and keep it going. Still as the Whistling Gypsy came to an end, I continued teaching. These days I average anywhere from 30 to 50 students, some private, some in classes, and teaching continues to be one of my main functions. I can't tell you how much fun it is for me to watch someone learn to play their first chord on a guitar :-). I do have times when I get a little burned out, but find me a class of adults who have never been near a guitar before and I'm happy as a pig in mud! When I get them playing their first song, the smiles on their faces are priceless.

My Dad didn't know what to think when I talked about playing guitar and performing when I was a kid. He didn't see that as anything more than a hobby. And it took many years for me to find the confidence to pursue the many avenues of music that I did. But if I had it all to do again, I wouldn't change any of it. The song in the video above, however, tells a different story. There is a poem out there called When I Am An Old Woman, I Shall Wear Purple, by Jenny Joseph. If you've never come across it, you might find it a treat to read. What it meant to me when I first read it, was the idea of believing that old age would bring with it a kind of liberation from having to do what we have to do now. At the end of the poem, the writer considers that perhaps she should start doing those crazy things in the present so that people won't get too shocked when she begins to wear purple in her old age.

The underlying message I think is the idea that we really want to live our lives fully and completely NOW. When I was writing this song, I was imaging getting to the end of one's life and having regrets. I sure hope I don't. Quick! Get me the purple clothes and the red hat!

IJ

2 comments:

  1. I don't teach guitar but yesterday was Thanksgiving here in the States and my 15 year old niece was visiting from Florida. My daughter and I enlisted her to play bass on a couple of rock tunes down in the basement after dinner. She wasn't very good but we were so loud it didn't really matter LOL. It made me feel good to see her get such a kick out of playing in our impromptu band. I don't get why a teenager wouldn't rather play a real guitar than that silly looking "Guitar Hero" thingy.

    Monty

    ReplyDelete

Hi and thanks for your input!